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Inside scoop on careers in arts, entertainment next on agenda

June 23, 2001|By RUDY YNIGUEZ, Staff Writer

Teaching young people how to venture into the arts and entertainment business will be at the heart of a third day of workshop presentations today.

Working out of Southwest High School in El Centro on Saturday, youngsters attending the event were treated to a variety of workshops on such topics as entrepreneurship, music production, entertainment company, careers in radio, television news, marketing and advertising, business management, dramatic arts, disc jockey and remixing, commercial acting, film and television, papier-mâché and watercolor painting.

The workshop on television news was presented by Kelly Stallworth, anchor/reporter for KYMA Channel 11, based in Yuma. The presentation was made in one of the high school's classrooms.

Stallworth said there is much more to producing television news than what is seen during the broadcast.

"What a lot of people don't realize about the news is that there's a whole lot of preparation," she said.

Some of that preparation includes live interviews, editing and writing. She said when she worked a morning show at the Yuma station her day typically started at 4 a.m., with show guests appearing by 5:30 to be interviewed.

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In addition to not knowing what a person is going say while being interviewed on live television, Stallworth said the reporter must deal without the TelePrompTer, a cueing device used in television stations that allows the person giving the news to read it. When live, a reporter must know how to ad-lib what needs to be said.

Stallworth, who had her career start in Detroit and received a degree from Wayne State University in Michigan, said ideas for new stories come from pounding the pavement and phones as well as from people in the community who call with tips.

"It's all about community," she said, adding if she did not love what she does she could not do it. "Without the community we don't exist. The story's not about us, it's about you."

When asked what advice she would give those interested in breaking into the business, Stallworth said they should seek internships and be ready to volunteer for any assignment. She said only so much can be learned from textbooks.

Stallworth said a person who is multi-talented is more valuable than one who is not. She said bilingual skills are a plus, as well as knowing how to use a computer. She said there is a healthy competition among people who want to be one the air.

"You have to take the initiative," she said, adding her success came from always volunteering to do the breaking news and being available. "Appreciation comes later."

Despite that experience at doing breaking news, Stallworth said the stories she dislikes the most are interviews with crime victims or those whose loved ones suffered some form of violence. She said those stories are common on Detroit television but less so locally.

"I like to do happy stories," she said. "I like to make people smile."

Her goal is eventually to be a sports reporter.

"My goal is to be a sideline reporter," she said.

Meanwhile, she said she loves what she does.

"I've known since I was itty-bitty this is what I wanted to do," she said.

She has been at KYMA since October.

The youth conference ends today at the Old Post Office Pavilion, 230 S. 5th St., El Centro. The day's events begin at 2 p.m. with registration, opening remarks are set for 3, workshops are at 3:30 and 4:30, discussion panels at 5:30 and the Gospel Explosion 2001 at 7.

The conference theme is "Empowerment through serving others in music and the arts." It is being sponsored by the Imperial County Coalition in Celebration of Cesar Chavez.

Co-sponsors include Calexico Neighborhood House, Youth Empowerment, KUBO 88.7 FM, Impact Community Network, Imperial County Arts Council, Youth Opportunity Program, Workforce Investment One Stop and Employment Services.

Another youth conference is tentatively set for October.

Staff Writer Rudy Yniguez can be reached at 337-3440.

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