Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: IVPress HomeCollections

Featured Articles from the Imperial Valley Press Online

News | By IMPERIAL VALLEY PRESS STAFF | July 21, 2011
There have been several reports about a “Ding Dong Ditcher” on the loose. The two areas that have suffered these attacks have been Brawley and Imperial. I say suffered because apparently this criminal is ringing doorbells as early as 3 a.m. For those of us who have to wake up early to go to work, this is disastrous. What can we do about this inconsiderate idiot that obviously has too much time on his/her hands? Oh … please don't suggest “the police.” - Tired, Imperial We're wondering whom we should contact, if we can't contact the police?
NEWS
By CHELCEY ADAMI | Staff Writer | June 27, 2013
CALEXICO - By mid-morning Wednesday, Pompeyo Tabarez was still settling into his new office as he began his first day as Calexico's police chief. Tabarez worked with the Imperial County Sheriff's Office for 33 years and is a native of Heber. He was sworn into the position of police chief during a private ceremony Tuesday and said that one of main challenges the Calexico Police Department faces is staffing. ”We're lacking enough personnel at all levels so we need to, hopefully through the upgraded budgeting in the city and Measure H, we're going to try to compensate for the shortages we've had in the past to bring up the staff levels,” he said.
NEWS
By JULIO MORALES | Staff Writer, Copy Editor | September 4, 2012
BRAWLEY - City officials expressed mixed feelings about a halfway house for federal prison inmates scheduled to open within the next few months. The residential re-entry center has been contracted to provide housing for about two dozen inmates as they seek to transition back into society. The federal Bureau of Prisons decided on establishing an RRC in the Valley some three years ago, said an official with the company contracted to run the facility, Anaheim-based Working Alternatives Inc. Bureaucratic delays kept the facility at 718 and 720 E St. from opening sooner.
NEWS
November 1, 2004
Story by HEATHER BREMNER, Photos by KEVIN MARTY, Staff A woman in white standing in the window of an abandoned building. A little girl waiting near the doorway of an old El Centro home. A cache of bones churned up while digging a canal. Every town has its ghost stories: stories of restless souls, children who died tragically, people murdered by the hand of a loved one. Their spirits must be searching for something, some say. They cannot rest in peace until they settle some score.
NEWS
By William Roller | Imperial Valley Press Staff | December 30, 2010
To get a career a young person needs an education, Bill Cole, a driver’s education instructor at Central Union High School in El Centro says. “Parents should be sure their students are in school and doing their best,” Cole said. Starting in January one of several laws takes effect in California. SB1317, sponsored by state Sen. Mark Leno, D-San Francisco, will charge parents with a misdemeanor if their children miss too much school. Parents could face a $2,000 fine and up to a year in jail if prosecutors prove they failed to reasonably encourage their children to attend school.
NEWS
By ALEJANDRO DAVILA and CHELCEY ADAMI | Staff Writers | October 31, 2012
Calexico High School senior Andrea Vizcarra doesn't like to be alone at the school at night. “Never have and don't want to,” she said while giggling. Ever since she was a sophomore, she has heard rumors of the school being haunted by Calexico High cheerleaders that died in a car crash in the '60s. People say that they see the figure of a girl walking around the school, particularly the gym, and on the field at night. “Once you hear that story, you start to get scared.
NEWS
By CHELCEY ADAMI | Staff Writer | July 27, 2013
BOMBAY BEACH - As celebrities like Simon Baker strolled nearby, Bombay Beach locals followed their normal routines Friday as an episode of the television show “The Mentalist” was filmed in their backyard. A film crew of more than 60 people worked in the heat throughout the day to film scenes both at the town's local diner as well as on the shores of the Salton Sea itself. The scenes will be featured in the award-winning crime drama's first episode of the new season, co-producer John Scherer said.
NEWS
By ERIC GALVAN, Staff Writer | August 30, 2007
The arrest of 25 people in Imperial and San Diego counties Thursday morning will ?place a significant dent? in the Mexican Mafia?s local operations, Imperial County District Attorney Gilbert Otero said. In what the DA?s Office is calling ?Operation Gangland,? 25 members of the Mexican Mafia ? including Imperial County head Patrick Ralph Ponce of El Centro and San Diego County head Richard Charles Buchanan ? were arrested as part of a 46-count indictment handed down through the San Diego Federal Grand Jury.
NEWS
By ELIZABETH VARIN | Digital Media News Editor | March 23, 2013
A 26-year-old off-duty Border Patrol agent died in a car collision Friday afternoon southeast of El Centro. Agent Francisco Puga with the El Centro Station died at the scene of the collision at the intersection of Bowker and McCabe roads while on his way to work, according to officials with the local Border Patrol union. The California Highway Patrol is investigating the collision, which also sent a woman to El Centro Regional Medical Center with moderate injuries that were not disclosed by the Highway Patrol.
NEWS
April 9, 2013
How often does a person who is on probation get tested for drugs? I see a person that I know is on probation and he seems to always be under the influence of drugs. Also, what happens if he violates his probation? - Curious, Imperial County This is an excellent question with a not very excellent answer. But that's no fault of who we went to for our info. Truth be told, there are so many variables involved in this question, from who gets testing as part of their probation terms, to how often they are subject to testing, to what exactly happens if someone violates probation.
NEWS
By ERIC GALVAN,Staff Writer | August 5, 2006
Through the 1980s, MTV defined a generation. Through the 1990s, it chartered new ground. And now, 25 years later, MTV is having the kind of effect on a generation that it did when it first aired ? kind of. Launched in 1981, Music Television recently turned 25 years old, but did so not so much with a bang, but rather with an attentionless thud. ?MTV didn?t even celebrate its 25th anniversary,? said Robert J. Thompson, popular culture professor and director of Syracuse University?
NEWS
July 16, 2001
The thornless hybrid mesquite is nearly the perfect tree for the desert. The mesquites are exceptionally well-adapted to the area and will tolerate a wide range of soil conditions and varying irrigation regimens. And they may be grown alone in full sun or in groups to make a more tropical jungle-like appearance. The mesquites are easy to recognize as they have rich, dark brown trunks and bright medium to dark green canopies. Some say the mesquites provide the appearance of the Serengeti African plains.
NEWS
By NICOLAS TABOREK, Staff Writer | July 30, 2009
CALEXICO ? Already upset over stalled contract negotiations, police officers here have picked a new fight with City Hall. In a lawsuit filed in federal court last month, the Calexico Police Officers Association argues members are owed back pay for the time it takes them to put on and take off their uniforms. Suiting up for work is a vital and time-consuming part of a cop?s job, the argument goes, so officers are entitled to compensation. Police officers across the state, including in San Diego and Los Angeles, have filed similar claims, now commonly referred to as ?
NEWS
By CHELCEY ADAMI, Staff Writer | July 16, 2013
Don't be surprised if you're walking in New York City and you run into a special quesadilla that tastes just like the ones from the Imperial Valley. Tyler Sanders, 29, and Kyle Cameron, 24, both of Brawley, and Christian Pineda, 26, of Tijuana, have opened their restaurant, Los Tacos No. 1, to rave reviews and daily long lines in New York City's Chelsea Market. While none of them formally studied culinary arts, all three have seemed to crack the New York City restaurant code with their handmade tortillas, simple menu, low prices and authentic styling.
NEWS
By ANTOINE ABOU-DIWAN | Staff Writer | November 21, 2012
Albert Salgado is arguably a lucky man. At 71 years of age, the Calexico resident has been cancer-free for 17 years, and credits something far more elemental than modern medicine for his cure: faith. The retired U.S. Customs agent started losing his voice in late 1994. What he initially thought was simply a sore throat was, in reality, a tumor in his left vocal chord. If there was one thing that was positive, it is that doctors identified the cancer in an early stage. They moved quickly and removed the tumor surgically.
Advertisement
Imperial Valley Press Online Articles
|
|
|