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News | November 20, 2012
Where in the Imperial Valley are people supposed to dispose of old used tires? There are tires dumped all over our deserts, and posters prohibiting dumping posted all over, but there are no places to take bad tires. - Tired of Old Tires, Ocotillo There aren't any locations in Imperial County that actually shred old tires, but there aren't many in the state to begin with. The California Department of Resources, Recycling and Recovery, better known as CalRecycle, only lists eight such facilities in the state, with the nearest being in Fontana.
NEWS
December 31, 2008
EDITOR?S NOTE: This is the final story of the top 10 stories of the year as selected by the newsroom staff. By SILVIO J. PANTA, Staff Writer The El Centro Police Department entered its centennial year in 2008, but that milestone was arguably overshadowed by the long-simmering discord over Police Chief Leonard Knight and his troubled leadership. What was known to City Manager Ruben Duran and other public officials long before Knight stepped down in the spring was the widespread dissatisfaction with the chief?
NEWS
By THOMAS TURINI | November 5, 2001
University of California-Imperial County Cooperative Extension A tree is a valuable commodity in the low desert. There are many kinds of trees in this area that are growing poorly. Some drop their leaves, others show branch dieback and in extreme cases the entire tree dies. The causes of these problems include that the tree is not suited to our climate or poor management or a disease may be involved. In some neighborhoods there are more dead trees than healthy ones, especially where ash or mulberry trees are popular.
NEWS
By William Roller | Imperial Valley Press Staff | December 30, 2010
To get a career a young person needs an education, Bill Cole, a driver’s education instructor at Central Union High School in El Centro says. “Parents should be sure their students are in school and doing their best,” Cole said. Starting in January one of several laws takes effect in California. SB1317, sponsored by state Sen. Mark Leno, D-San Francisco, will charge parents with a misdemeanor if their children miss too much school. Parents could face a $2,000 fine and up to a year in jail if prosecutors prove they failed to reasonably encourage their children to attend school.
NEWS
Imperial Valley Press Staff | January 17, 2011
Shortly after relocating to the area I had to visit a smog station in order to renew my vehicle registration. The mechanic said my out-of-county vehicle prevented him from performing a smog check. He also said if I went to the Department of Motors Vehicles and told them I relocated to Mexicali, they would waive any smog requirements. Is this true? Are there legal ramifications for such a fib? — Smogging in El Centro Sorry Smogging, it doesn’t seem like you’d be able to get out of testing your vehicle.
NEWS
By DARREN SIMON | March 24, 2002
Staff Writer The time is 10 p.m. The day, Friday. It's cold; the wind gusty. A lone woman walks along Adams Avenue near 12th Street in El Centro. She is pacing in front of a liquor store ? waiting, watching. A pickup pulls up beside her; the driver looking for a little company. "Looking for a date?" the woman asks. For several hours Friday night and Saturday morning that scenario played out over and over again. The woman was one of three undercover officers taking part in an operation meant to strike at those soliciting the services of prostitutes and ultimately get some drugs and drug pushers off the streets.
NEWS
June 30, 2008
QUESTION: When I moved to the Valley in the early ?80s the city limit signs indicated the elevation of El Centro to be minus 45 feet. There was even a sign on Evan Hewes Highway that advertised El Centro as the biggest city entirely below sea level. The signs now indicate the city?s elevation is 45 feet. Did the city actually experience a cataclysmic event that raised it 90 feet and, if so, why wasn?t it in the paper? Can you find out why the signs no longer indicate the proper elevation?
NEWS
By Brianna Lusk | October 29, 2006
Staff Writer It?s the feeling you get when you walk into a dark room. Something in the corner catches your eye, or a shadow moves behind the drapes unexpectedly. The hairs on the back of your neck instantly stand on end and goose bumps run down your arms. Whether you?ve experienced something like the following stories or you dismiss tales of floating orbs and see-through Caspers as nothing more than figments of one?s imagination, the Imperial Valley has a number of haunting stories passed down through the years.
NEWS
January 25, 2003
(EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the first of a two-part series dealing with Calipatria State Prison's "Straight Life" intervention program for juvenile offenders. Part two will be published Tuesday.) By MICHAEL A. SALORIO Staff Writer Dateline: Calipatria State Prison Six juvenile offenders were given a tour of the facilities here Friday and spoken to by a group of 18 inmates participating in the "Straight Life" youth intervention program. Calipatria State Prison Correctional Lt. Gary Stratton explained that unlike the "Scared Straight" program, which was known for having prisoners yell at young criminal offenders in order to invoke the horrors of prison life, the Straight Life program is more of a counseling session with the juveniles during which the prisoners discuss the actions that led them to be incarcerated and the nature of prison life.
NEWS
By MICHAEL A. SALORIO | April 8, 2003
Staff Writer CALIPATRIA STATE PRISON ? The 57-year-old inmate stabbed to death here Monday morning was a founding member of the Aryan Brotherhood prison gang, according to a prison official. Correctional Lt. Gary Stratton identified the victim as Wendell Norris, who had been incarcerated for 24 years on a second-degree murder conviction out of Solano County. The Aryan Brotherhood is a white supremacist prison gang with a feared reputation for committing ruthless acts of violence, the Southern Poverty Law Center's Web site states.
OPINION
November 11, 2003
Did you ever wonder what happened to the great newspaper editors of bygone days like H.L. Mencken or even William Randolph Hearst? Back 50 years ago New York City had seven newspapers. There was potential to sell a million papers a day since the city had 5 million to 6 million inhabitants. Now New York has two real ones and a scandal paper. Just 12 years ago Memphis, Chattanooga, Nashville and Knoxville, Tenn., had two papers but now only one. Maybe the important question to ask is, "What happened to the newspapers?"
NEWS
February 26, 2010
I went to Subway the other day to buy two footlongs. I wanted one toasted and was told by the employee that Subway now charges to have a footlong toasted. My question is, why? I asked the employee and she didn’t have an answer. Are they going to charge for baking your bread, too? Is the oven contracted by some other company? What gives? Money is not the issue, just curiosity. I think it sounds ridiculous? — Soft and Doughy, El Centro We chose to answer this question as an example of the public’s blatant abuse of PROBE.
NEWS
By MARIO RENTERÍA, Sports Editor | January 24, 2010
Sparta in ancient Greece was no doubt a fascinating city in world history. Its dominant military power ensured the Spartans a spot in the B.C. timeline. The ancient Greeks were also the first to have established boxing. That, plus its mentality of discipline and training is why longtime boxer and new boxing gymnasium owner Fernando Lara decided to name his new gym, Sparta Boxing. “When I was in college, I did a report on the city of Sparta and I was very fascinated with it to the point where I named my youngest son, Maximus,” Lara said.
NEWS
By WILLIAM ROLLER | Imperial Valley Press Staff Writer | February 17, 2011
After years of business Imperial Valley Resource Recovery LLC is closing down, but it owes substantial sums of money and local vendors say they might not be paid. Imperial Valley Resource Recovery, 3505 Highway 111, is a biomass plant that converts wood waste for fuel to produce electricity, said plant manager Roy Long. It opened in 1989 under the ownership of Hydroco but is controlled by parent corporation Leucadia National, a New York holding company, Long said. “It’s true, the company owes local vendors a lot of money,” Long said.
BUSINESS
By RICHARD M. BROWN | Imperial Valley Press Assistant Editor | March 6, 2011
Marty Coyne, Owner, Owner, Imperial Valley Cycle Center 1334 N. Imperial Ave., El Centro, CA 92243 760-353-2110 www.ivcycle.com Tell us how you ended up in this line of work. When I was 12, I dreamed of owning and working on motorcycles. That’s when I got my first dirt bike. In 1972, when I was 15 years old, I worked as a lot boy in Lemon Grove at a dealership for $1.25 an hour. During my career I have owned six dealerships and currently own three. What are memories from your career that stick out with you the most?
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